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OrthoArizona has 70 premier musculoskeletal specialists. The orthopedic surgeons and primary care physicians specialize in all areas of orthopedic care including sports, medicine, spine, shoulder and elbow, hand and wrist, hip and knee, foot and ankle, podiatry, trauma, industrial injuries and workers’ compensation.

Mobility After a Knee Replacement

Having a knee replaced in your life is a big step and can provide immediate happiness that you don’t have to go through life in such pain any more.  If you’ve had a knee replaced, it meant that the damage sustained to your knee was beyond any rehabilitative course of action. But what is life after a knee replacement? Is everything back to normal? We will cover a few things that cover mobility after a knee replacement.

Right after the replacement

It is recommended you put little to no stress on your knee after it is replaced. This stage will be the least mobile you will be throughout recovery. A therapist will meet with you and begin instructing you on simple measures like sitting down, getting up, and using the bathroom to limit the stress you put on the new knee.

After that, you will begin physical therapy and learn some simple exercises you can do to improve your knee’s strength and flexibility. You always want to take physical therapy seriously. It will determine the level of recovery you have when life returns to normal.

Returning to normalcy

Throughout this stage, you will continue to work with your physical therapist on making a recovery. You will need to use this time to move around as much as possible without becoming tired. The knee will start to heal during this stage, and immobilization will cause a buildup of scar tissue, which will compromise how effective your knee will be in the future. Remember, everything you do after a knee replacement determines how effective it will be in your new life.

Always listen to the occupational and physical therapists as they are trained and set you up for success. The goal of a knee replacement is to get you back to a normal life of being pain-free, so don’t do anything that can compromise that.

Life after recovery

After you have completed all the necessary requirements by medical professionals, you can expect to see significant results with mobility and lack of pain. Physical activity is always a great thing to do for your body, but there are some rules to look out for when it comes to the impact on your new knee. Running/jogging, jumping, and any other exercises that put heavy stress and impact on your joints. This can increase the risk of injury and wearing out your knee.

It is encouraged to do physical exercise that limits damage on your knee like light hikes, swimming, walking, biking, and golf, as well as other things. After you are recovered and living life with your new knee, you will be able to enjoy life and will know when going too far is too far. While life should be mobile and pain-free, the goal is to keep it that way. Always be listening to your body as it will tell you when too much stress is coming on.

Lastly, your new knee may not feel like your old knee. This is a stage that will require some getting used to as you may hear popping and other random noises and feelings. This is the metal and plastic in your knee coming together, but if you are not physically hurting because of it, you are fine. This type of procedure is highly successful, and up to 90 percent of people that have this done say their knee lasts well into the 20-year mark before having any issues. A new knee is a new look on life. It gives people their lives back of being mobile and pain-free.

Speak with an Orthopedic Specialist Today

Are you suffering from knee pain? Make an appointment with one of our orthopedic specialists today to start your healing journey. OrthoArizona has 21 offices throughout the Valley, each focused on quality care, compassion, and excellent customer service. Since 1994, OrthoArizona has been dedicated to compassionate care of the highest quality.

The advice and information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace or counter a physician’s advice or judgment. Please always consult your physician before taking any advice learned here or in any other educational medical material.